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Blogging the SCWH Luncheon – 1

Just heard Kevin Levin’s talk on blogging and concluded my own presentation at the Society of Civil War Historians luncheon here at the New Orleans Sheraton on Canal Street.  Am now listening to Anne Rubin’s review of her involvement in the famous Valley of the Shadow project as a grad student at U Va.  She has in recent years become a little disenchanted with the current availability of online Civil War sites because even the best of them are basically archival.  Historians haven’t used the medium as a way to convey historiography and interpretations to a broader audience.

I’ll leave aside the details of her talk, since it will shortly be uploaded to this blog — and maybe Kevin Levin’s as well.  But I’m curious to hear the group discussion all three papers after Ann’s presentation concludes.

UPDATE – It should have occurred to me that I’d be a participant in the Q&A and therefore couldn’t blog the Q&A.  But I made notes and I’ll be able to re-cap the discussion in a subsequent post.  In the meantime, it’s 3 p.m. in New Orleans and somewhere a beer has my name on it. :-)

Comments (1) to “Blogging the SCWH Luncheon – 1”

  1. “She has in recent years become a little disenchanted with the current availability of online Civil War sites because even the best of them are basically archival. Historians haven’t used the medium as a way to convey historiography and interpretations to a broader audience.”

    Excellent point of discussion and I agree with her. There is so much potential on the Web and it is not being used to its full potential. Despite what my diploma will say when I walk away from my current graduate program at JMU, digital history has been the central focus in all my work throughout the program. I suppose we need to redefine what it means to be a digital historian.